Session Outlines

Program Outline
Chasing the horizon: 25 years of anticipating library change - Cameron Morley
ALIA Professional Development Scheme - Lauren Gobbett
How to deal with change . . . like a boss - Katrina Williams
Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes (turn and face the strange [sector]) - Anne Newton & Jo Croucher
Grow Your Own Gang: Using the UTS Library Engagement Team as a Model for Your Library - Tess Aitken; Alycia Bailey; Rosie Glynn; Brian Kenady
Getting all Technical with research data support - Karen Visser
WORKSHOP! DIY video using smartphones and final showcase - Mare Maticevski
WORKSHOP! Getting down and dirty: Modern realities of special libraries (a masterclass) - Angela Vilkins, Cassie Pummell, Anna Landy, Amy Walduck
Transforming library's fixed service point to proactive virtual services - Wayne Shephard & Stephanie Simon
In It to Win It: The very hungry new grad - Diane Ingram
Public libraries: A state library's role among a network of local government services - Michelle Hughes & Janet McGuinness
From library marketing to library user experience: My DIY Journey - Edward Luca
Visibility: how to shine a light on what you do! Or Advocacy Starter - Adele Walsh
Indigenous Collections at the NLA - Nicolette Suttor & John Morseu
Who do you think you are? Being genuine in the workplace - Jennifer Nash & Laura Stroud
DIY opportunities: Building Librarians’ Choice as an advocacy tool for libraries - Melanie Mutch & Megan Tolnay
I’m going to build my own symposium, with learning and dialogue! An experimental conference model - Andrew Kelly
WORKSHOP! DIY Marketing for Libraries - Jade Koekoe
WORKSHOP! eResource licensing negotiation skills - Libby Cass
WORKSHOP! Reviewing and Writing Papers for Publication - Gaby Haddow, Bhuva Narayan, Caitlin Stone & Mary Anne Kennan
Styled for success: A panel discussion on fashion, individuality and dressing professionally for the library and information sector - Pixie Stardust
From selling insurance to buying rare books for the State Library of New South Wales - Amy McKenzie
eResource licensing and negotiation skills - panel discussion facilitated by Libby Cass
Origin of the species’, or how an LIS professional is built - Mary Carroll & Sue Reynolds
Shaping the Australian library and information profession’s research agenda: new librarians’ perspectives - Lisa M. Given & Helen Partridge
Reading between the Wines - Morgan Borthwick & Laura Caygill
Hong Kong Libraries Connect: the DIY library network - Chloe Lei, Chris Chan, Joanna Hare, Kayo Chang
Library Ninja Coders - Karina Tumon
Guerrilla #Research: How To DIY Research - Anne Reddacliff & Kate Masters
Project management fun and games! - Krista Meulengracht
#Auslibchat and social librarians: Building and mantaining your online professional identity - Elizabeth Alvey, James McGoran, Katie Miles- Barnes
"Oh the places you’ll go”: Get out there and make an international librarian exchange happen - Jennifer Thomas
Building volunteer networks that rock - Jacinta Sutton
"Hello, my name is Intern" Upskilling employees at the University of Adelaide Libraries - Catherine Marais & Rani Thompson
Prisoners have a right to information - Deborah Fuller
21st century skills for 21st century GLAMs - Natalia Fibrich
What to expect in a modern Library Management System: A hands-on workshop using Koha - Bob and Irma Birchall
Oral History Projects: making it simple - Sharee Cordes
Librarians and Dragons - Madelin Meddlycott & Michael Hawks
But I dont want to code: Three emerging IT Skills for Librarians (other than coding) and how to start developing them - Samantha Searle
From chaos to calm through storytelling and community building in GLAM and beyond: A journey and conversation about Knowledge Management - Clare O’Hanlon & Eleanor Colla
Free software, open standards and you - Michael Harris
Library Leadership: A DIY Career - Maeva Masterson
Increasing Digital Preservation Skills in Libraries - Kimberley Dye

Saturday 24th June

Session One

THEATRE

Chasing the horizon: 25 years of anticipating library change
Cameron Morley 

Anticipating the future of library services, while continuing to meet current demand and deliver high quality services is vital to ensure growth and adaptation in our changing world. Many libraries have experienced considerable growth and change over recent years, and have increased their relevance through a combination of judicious environmental scanning, good data, consultation, advocacy and resource allocation. Cameron’s talk will include a range of real-world examples from the State Library and public library sector, and reflect on some career lessons to date.
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TRAINING ROOM

ALIA Professional Development Scheme
Lauren Gobbett

The ALIA Professional Development Scheme supports ALIA members to plan and undertake PD activities to accrue points through-out the year. After partaking in this scheme you are eligible to upgrade to ALIA Certified Professional membership. The aim of this program is to foster ongoing learning to suit your goals and professional practice.
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CONFERENCE ROOM

How to deal with change…like a boss
Katrina Williams

There’s only one thing that can really be guaranteed in life and career: things won’t always go as planned. Regardless of qualifications, experience, sector, responsibility, age or gender, dealing with change is inescapable – but dealing positively and effectively with change is a choice and an important tool in the information professional’s kit. This session offers a professional and personal investment through mindfulness and change theory, plus practical advice from those who have gone before, empowering you to not just cope with change but to be a leader during times of uncertainty. A great way to set the scene for your NLS8 experience.
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FERGUSON ROOM

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes (turn and face the strange [sector])
Anne Newton & Jo Croucher

This session is aimed at de-mystifying the process of changing sectors throughout your library career, and helping attendees feel as though they can take some control over the process. It will share how the two authors have changed sectors throughout their working lives, the advantages and disadvantages of these opportunities. Attendees will be given tools and techniques for applying for jobs in unfamiliar sectors, as well as reflective prompts for why they may one day wish to pursue such a change. This session should leave attendees feeling that they have more control over their career direction, or that they can make a change (DIY!) to meet their own needs.
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Session Two

THEATRE

Grow Your Own Gang: Using the UTS Library Engagement Team as a Model for Your Library
Tess Aitken; Alycia Bailey; Rosie Glynn; Brian Kenady

The (University of Technology Sydney) UTS Library Engagement Gang will run a hands-on workshop where delegates will learn how to assess their library’s levels of engagement and improve their own professional practice in this area. They will be able to recognise and build upon necessary skills to create their own version of UTS Library’s Engagement Gang. This session will talk about how to create opportunities to develop skills such as event management and design, leading a team, social media and collaboration with other departments.
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In It to Win It: The very hungry new grad
Diane Ingram

At the end 2015, I graduated into a new profession, with a new career, job, team and role. The professional qualification teaches us well – theories, frameworks, exemplars, stories and practicums to name a few, but how do you put it into practice? Will we be mentored? Will we be trained? Will we have autonomy? How will we be perceived by the Team and will we fit in? Join me, and be prepared to share, as I take you through the thrills and spills of my first year as a Librarian. Using existing skills and drawing on the power of networking to build relationships, I established connections, created opportunities to develop new skills, and put learning into practice, emerging from being the new grad in the room to a valued Subject/Liaison Librarian and active member of the library team. I made it happen for me, remembering always the people who opened those all-important first doors.
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From library marketing to library user experience: My DIY Journey
Edward Luca

Thinking about user experience (UX) is not only for those whose job title or primary responsibilities are UX-related: everyone working in a library has some stake in improving library experience for its users through adopting a Library User Experience approach. I will be discussing the value of integrating User Experience Design, Design Thinking, Information Architecture and marketing principles with the core services of the library in close collaboration with librarians, designers, artists, students, management, staff, and researchers. Pursuing such projects has also given me exciting opportunities to write about my work, develop academic journal articles and teach students from the same program I graduated from. I will speak from my experiences of simultaneously being a librarian and a communications officer and demonstrate how I have developed my personal brand as a library practitioner.
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Indigenous Collection Material from within the National Library of Australia
Nicolette Suttor & John Morseu

This presentation will highlight the development and preservation of indigenous community collections at the National Library of Australia.
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IT TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! Getting all Technical with research data support
Karen Visser, Natasha Simons, Kathryn Unsworth.

This workshop is a hands-on (please BYO Device, preferably laptop), technically focused, research data discovery experience. It explores the most common situations a librarian might find themselves in when working with researchers. Research data support increasingly requires some understanding of the underlying technical components associated with creating accurate metadata records and supporting researchers to understand the links between data and publications. This workshop assumes some basic technical capability eg. download simple applications – but is accessible for everyone. It would be most useful for those seeking careers in: universities, research institutes and government. Some of the components of this 3 hour session will use “Challenge me” activities from the 23 (research data) Things program. This is a complex and fascinating facet of data librarianship and 3 hours will only be an introduction. Opportunities for building on the foundation laid during this workshop will be discussed.
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TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! DIY video using smartphones and final showcase
Mare Maticevski

In the workshop, participants will learn basic elements of filmmaking within a limited timeframe using mobile technology. Participants will be introduced to a variety of creation tools available on smartphones as we’ll as learn the basics of planning, shooting and editing successful and engaging short videos. Leave with a toolkit enabling creation of short videos independently or in small groups over the duration of the NLS8 conference. Complete videos can be shared via social media using the hashtag #NLS8. The best short videos will be hosted on the NLS8 website.
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CONFERENCE ROOM

WORKSHOP! Getting down and dirty: Modern realities of special libraries (a masterclass)
Angela Vilkins, Cassie Pummell, Anna Landy, Amy Walduck

Presented by a specialist team from GRAIL – Government Research and Information Library based at State Library of Queensland. This scenario based workshop, drawn from actual examples, will expand your knowledge of government libraries and your notions of customer service. This workshop will offer experience in the art of wrangling digital resources. How do you purchase digital resources AND get the best outcome for your library members AND for your budget AND keep your vendors happy. What access or licence model/s would work best for your special library? You will tease out possible solutions to scenarios, discuss group solutions and examine the solutions implemented. The workshop session is aimed at librarians and students who want to learn more about Special Library environments today, digital resources and vendor client relationships.
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Who do you think you are? Being genuine in the workplace
Jennifer Nash & Laura Stroud

‘Being yourself’ at work. Do you think this concept sounds terrifying? Maybe this session is for you! We will discuss the benefits of being your genuine self and using your unique skills and abilities, and how this can create a pathway for your career development and add real value to your organisation. What do you love, and how can you bring that passion into your work? We will present on how to find and define your niche, including examples from our own professional lives in areas such as social media, storytelling, blogging and being generally awesome. (Hint: it’s all about confidence).
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FERGUSON ROOM

Transforming library’s fixed service point to proactive virtual services
Wayne Shephard & Stephanie Simon

University of South Australia Library has recently transformed the enquiry service delivery model. Fixed information desks were replaced with video booths and telephones and proactive chat widgets were installed on all Library webpages. The responsibility of responding to virtual queries was rolled out from one specialised team to a large portion of the staff across all 5 campus library service areas. Our session will involve describing the ‘cutting edge’ technology and software used in this transition as well as the need for self-instigated training and supported team training. The ability to self-assess and self-instigate is essential in order to succeed in an increasingly digital library environment. This ability ensures staff confidence operating the new service model and technology and a high level of customer service, regardless of how patrons contact the University Library. This model ensures patrons can make meaningful contact with the library anywhere, anytime, any device.
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Public libraries: A state library’s role among a network of local government services
Michelle Hughes & Janet McGuinness

This session will provide an overview of how the State Library of Queensland (SLQ) supports the network of over 320 public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres (IKCs) across the state, and will provide an opportunity for conference delegates to learn how SLQ seeks feedback and input from public libraries to inform future directions. The presenters will focus on some highlights of how SLQ communicates its contribution to The Next Horizon: VISION 2017 for Queensland public libraries (VISION 2017); seeks input from public libraries through consultation as demonstrated by Advancing Queensland Public Libraries Consultation Findings; and undertakes research to inform future support, illustrated by the QUT research report The Impact of Libraries as Creative Spaces.
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Visibility: how to shine a light on what you do! Or Advocacy Starter
Adele Walsh

Self-promotion – a concept that generates strong reactions. However, visibility and self-advocacy are important in bringing attention to your achievements and the needs of your audience. We will look at five ways you can raise the awareness of your program (and you) within your organisation, community and networks while being grounded. Advocacy starts with you, and this presentation gives participants a starter kit into how to think about viability and where to start.
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DIY opportunities: Building Librarians’ Choice as an advocacy tool for libraries
Melanie Mutch & Megan Tolnay

One of the most rewarding aspects of working in public libraries is the potential to innovate and implement new programs and services that will have a profound impact on your community. But innovation takes more than a good idea. How many times have you not acted on a good idea because you felt it was unachievable? Sometimes we are limited in our capacity to spark an idea into action due to lack of opportunity. Rather than being limited by these challenges, one solution is to craft your own story and create your own opportunity. Librarians’ Choice is a national professional advocacy and reader’s advisory campaign founded by two public librarians and launched at the 2016 ALIA National Conference. It is a program that harnesses the collective knowledge of library staff and showcases the impact we have in building word-of-mouth for new books and authors, and on the national reading culture. Librarians’ Choice offers professional development opportunities for library staff, builds the collective profile by speaking with a unified voice, connects readers with books, fosters relationships between libraries and publishers, and provides content for library promotions.
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Session Three

THEATRE

I’m going to build my own symposium, with learning and dialogue! An experimental conference model
Andrew Kelly

When you have a new and interesting conference model what do you do? You get inspired by the Bard himself and run a conference within a conference! Rather than listen to someone present a paper, join Andrew Kelly as he facilitates a flipped symposium model. The workshop will take previous speakers and re-present their ideas in an open forum, allowing for in-depth discussion and idea sharing. Compare the two styles and feedback what you liked and disliked, help the new model grow and share the idea with others. Bring questions, share answers, and be the change you want to see.
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IT TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! DIY Marketing for Libraries
Jade Koekoe

The aim of this workshop is to: Explore marketing strategies for libraries, introduce basic design principals, and raise awareness of freely available digital tools. This workshop will give you the skills to successfully promote library events, and provide ideas on how to keep the momentum going long after the event is over. Participants will learn about marketing strategies and using social media or print materials to your advantage while learning some basic design principals that will enable you to create stunning promotional material. And what’s a workshop without a chance to play? Using freely available digital tools participants will have an opportunity to put their learning to the test, be creative and come up with some design solutions.
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TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! eResource licensing negotiation skills
Libby Cass

A hands-on workshop where participants will learn tips and trick for dealing with vendors when negotiating for access to eresources. The workshop is designed to give participants a good understanding of the dynamics of publisher negotiations and to help them develop the resilience, skills and confidence they need to get the best from each negotiation. Securing sound deals means libraries will get the maximum from their budget, deliver better value to their patrons and enhance their overall impact.
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CONFERENCE ROOM

WORKSHOP! Reviewing and Writing Papers for Publication
Gaby Haddow, Mary Anne Kennan, Bhuva Narayan, Caitlin Stone

The aim of this workshop is to inform and engage information professionals in two aspects of the publishing process; peer reviewing and writing papers for journal publications. Participation in these activities by practicing librarians contributes to personal professional development as critical thinkers and researcher-practitioners and to the profession in the form of providing evidence based practice. The skills gained in reviewing papers provide potential authors with an excellent foundation for writing a paper for publication. The presenters will provide an overview of the reviewing and publishing processes and participants will then be guided and supported by the presenters to work in small groups to review a short sample paper and draft a publication plan. The proposed programme aims to bring attendees together with the hope that future collaborations may eventuate. Participants might find it useful to bring their own device such as a laptop, although materials will be provided to work offline.
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FERGUSON ROOM

Styled for success: A panel discussion on fashion, individuality and dressing professionally for the library and information sector
Pixie Stardust and guests

The transition from dressing for study and casual work to dressing for your professional career can be tough. It can be hard to figure out the best way to present yourself that is appropriate for the organisation and the role. How do you dress both professionally and memorably? How do you create your style brand? How do you dress for different sectors? Should you dress differently in interviews than you do everyday? These questions and more will be addressed in this session, featuring a panel of sartorially resplendent early career professionals from a range of sectors. The panel will share their stories of cultivating a professional approach whilst staying true to their individual style brand. I will also share my experiences of dealing with stylists and the media as an example of the need to stay true to yourself and the professional brand that you have cultivated. The session will include a slide presentation of librarian fashion, past and present. PANELISTS: Amy Walduck, Ben Manolas, and Sonja Barfoed.
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From selling insurance to buying rare books for the State Library of New South Wales
Amy McKenzie

In 2014 I made a leap into the unknown, moving from Melbourne to Sydney to join the new Collection Strategy and Development branch at the State Library of New South Wales. Following a major restructure, this branch had been created to operate as the single point of coordination and decision making for the acquisition of all original and published materials. Because this was a completely new way of doing things for the Library, we had to come up with new ways of doing things. There was no instruction manual – we had to get out the toolbox and start from scratch. I’ll describe how my previous experience, which included resolving insurance disputes, managing the office of a natural therapies clinic, and selling second hand wedding dresses at a recycled clothing boutique, has helped me navigate the world of purchasing 18th century books for a major cultural institution.
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Sunday 25th June

Session One

THEATRE

eResource licensing and negotiation skills
Panel discussion facilitated by Libby Cass

The facilitated panel discussion provides an opportunity to hear experts from the sector will talk about their experiences in advocating for better access to e-resources.
Jessica Coates – ADA and ALCC Executive Officer. Jessica Coates will provide input in relation to copyright, in particular insight into how to advocate for copyright over contract/licence.
Sue McKerracher – ALIA Executive Director. Sue will share ALIA’s advocacy experience, tips and tricks when campaigning/negotiating for change.
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TRAINING ROOM

Origin of the species’, or how an LIS professional is built
Mary Carroll & Sue Reynolds

Using the concept of ‘paying it forward’ this session will explore means for shaping future information professionals; that is, those influences, people, concepts and ideas which can scaffold, construct, sustain and future proof the information profession so that it remains an active and vibrant sector. Referencing recent research into passion-based learning, the concept of ‘learning to be’, good citizenship, and communities of practice participants will be invited to reflect on past and potential influences and factors which inspire and excite them and how they in turn can inspire others to contribute to professional identity and maintain active and established membership of a professional community. Participants will also be asked to consider what they in turn will pay forward to ensure a dynamic and passionate profession into the future.
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CONFERENCE ROOM

Shaping the Australian library and information profession’s research agenda: new librarians’ perspectives
Lisa M. Given & Helen Partridge

It is frequently noted that there is a divide between research and practice in library and information science (LIS). LIS researchers lament that practitioners are not applying research findings and LIS practitioners say research is too “ivory tower” and not relevant to practice. Although there may be some truth to these statements, there are many points of collaboration and application of research across the sector. How, then, can new librarians prepare for their roles as “researcher-practitioners”? How can they engage with academics and other practitioners with shared research interests? This inverted panel explores researcher-practitioner engagement by critically considering: what research topics should be explored in the Australian library and information profession? The panelists will act as critical friends, enabling and supporting the discussion and critically exploring the realities faced by researchers and practitioners in conducting and applying research in library and information practice contexts.
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FERGUSON ROOM

Reading between the Wines
Morgan Borthwick & Laura Caygill

Does your library struggle to connect with young professionals? Do you have a great idea you’re nervous to get off the ground? Laura and Morgan will share the story of how they and a small group of colleagues got Reading between the Wines, a bar-hopping book club, off the ground at Auckland Libraries. The book club launched in 2015 and meets every month in a different bar around Auckland’s central suburbs. The librarians bring a selection of books that people can browse and borrow on the night while they enjoy a glass of their favourite beverage, some great food, and great company. About 35 regulars and newbies turn up each month (the biggest gathering was 60 people, which blew everyone’s minds). Join us for an entertaining look at how we took the idea of a book group for young professionals and turned it into an overwhelming hit.
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Session Two

THEATRE

Hong Kong Libraries Connect: the DIY library network
Chloe Lei, Chris Chan, Joanna Hare, Kayo Change

What to do when you want to meet other librarians? Start your own library network! Hong Kong Libraries Connect (HKLC) is an independent network established in June 2016, with a goal to connect Hong Kong library professionals across sectors and build a community that contributes to local and international discourse about librarianship.   Our presentation will be about our DIY ethos, from creating a website and organising events to coordinating a library mentoring program. We will also share our progress of how our group has developed over the last 12 months, and where we hope to be in the next 12 months.
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“Oh the places you’ll go”: Get out there and make an international librarian exchange happen
Jennifer Thomas

In 2015, I embarked on a year-long work exchange to Ryerson University Library and Archives (RULA) in Toronto, Canada. I swapped with two librarians from RULA who came to my place of work, the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Library, for six months each. I will discuss how, with strong support from both institutions, the exchange came to fruition, how we navigated the murky bureaucracy that accompanied such an undertaking, and what the benefits were, and continue to be, of this new collaborative friendship that has emerged between us as library professionals and institutions. This session is aimed at new and not-so-new library graduates who are seeking adventure, and seeking to build upon their careers by thinking outside the box and discovering the types of opportunities that are out there in the library sector.
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“Hello, my name is Intern” Upskilling employees at the University of Adelaide Libraries
Catherine Marais & Rani Thompson

In 2016, the University of Adelaide Libraries undertook an internal Internship Program to upskill existing employees of the library to learn the skills and roles within the area of Learning and Research Services. This included, but was not limited to: knowledge and experience in using major databases; being introduced to key academics; and contributing to Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) sessions. Opportunities were also given to attend courses, training sessions, and one on one consultations between Research Librarians and students. This presentation will explore how the Internship Program evolved and progressed, the challenges and victories faced by the participants, and the wide range of upskilling the program provided. We hope to convey how personal and professional development doesn’t have to be all about attending courses and filling in the required paperwork, but about fostering connections across departments and making friends in the process.
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IT TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! Library Ninja Coders
Karina Tumon

Library folks search through hundreds of websites to find information, but do we really know how they are created? By knowing what’s “behind the scene”, not only can we create online information by hand-crafting our own websites but most importantly we gain the confidence and understanding of the technology shaping our profession. By being able to code using HTML, we can contribute to the maintenance of library systems and by doing so, we can innovate and provide cutting edge services. The Library Ninja Coders workshop is an interactive session where attendees will learn HTML and CSS basics; hand-craft a webpage by simply using a text editor such as Notepad; and Have FUN! Attendees need to come prepared with a simple web page plan (including text and images). It could be just a simple web page about yourself, your library or your favourite hobby, but really it could be about anything!
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TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! Guerrilla #Research: How To DIY Research
Anne Reddacliff & Kate Masters

This session will teach participants how to design and execute a DIY research project, use ethnographic research methodologies, manage and collect research data, and communicate research data using social media. It will promote an inspire participants to pursue their own research interests, teach the tools of DIY research, address issues faced by researchers such as ethical considerations and sharing research data by using hands-on exercises and discussion.
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CONFERENCE ROOM

WORKSHOP! Project management fun and games!
Krista Meulengracht

This session is aimed at anyone who is interested in engaging more with projects and project management, whether they are a novice or an experienced professional… as long as you are up for some fun and games! Come to this session to learn some general principles, as well as some specific details, about projects and project management, all through various games. For example: Consider the importance of defining a project’s purpose with “Mad lib mission statements”, learn some basic concepts with “Project management bingo”, understand team dynamics with “Playing card speed-dating”, investigate risk management through “PM’s deal or no deal”, and experience the difference between team styles with “Positive and negative” Additional project management resources, templates and examples will also be supplied to take away.
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FERGUSON ROOM

#Auslibchat and social librarians: Building and mantaining your online professional identity
Elizabeth Alvey, James McGoran, Katie Miles-Barnes

This talk draws on the library and information sector’s use of Twitter and the example of ALIA NGAC’s monthly #auslibchat to explore the benefits and challenges of using your online identity as a networking tool. After some discussion of those benefits, and any possible contentious aspects of self-branding, attendees will be posed a series of questions to encourage them explore and define their own expectations, boundaries and aspirations.
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Building volunteer networks that rock
Jacinta Sutton

Close your eyes, look into your career future and there’s a good chance your library will have a team of volunteers.

Onsite, from home, crowdsourced, long term, short term – there are all kinds of volunteers. They can add significant value to your library and managing these networks and making them shine is a skillset that can make you stand out in the library world.

Jacinta will share how she built a high functioning team of volunteers at State Library of Queensland, launched SLQ’s new online transcription presence and tapped into the true value that volunteers bring to libraries – and how you can too (hint: it’s something to do with our innate human propensity for community). This session will share practical steps and strategies on how to show leadership in the digital volunteer space and harness the skills of your community.

Volunteers enrich your library, whether it’s improving the quality of data, adding new knowledge or teaching you how to manage people, they strengthen libraries in unexpected ways. And you know what? They’ll enrich you too.
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Prisoners have a right to information
Deborah Fuller

The ALIA Minimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners in 2015 states that everybody has the right to read, learn and access information, including prisoners. Prison libraries and librarians are essential to achieving this. Information professionals are ideally placed to advocate for this and to endeavour to close the information divide for an increasingly disadvantaged section of our community. In addition, to the information divide, prisoners are also becoming victims of the digital divide, with the use of the internet being banned for all prisoners in Australia and access to computers restricted to educational use only. The prison population consists of a disproportionately high number of people with low literacy, indigenous Australians, people who have been abused as children and those suffering from mental illness Studies have shown that crime and substance abuse is higher in those with low literacy and that recidivism (returning to prison) is reduced by educating prisoners.
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Session Three

THEATRE

21st century skills for 21st century GLAMs
Natalia Fibrich

This session introduces you to the critical 21st century skills required to create thriving Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums. This session will explore the top 12 skills required to navigate your GLAM through a rapidly changing 21st century. There has never been a more exciting time in the GLAM sector – these changes offer infinite possibilities and exciting opportunities for those who wish to take responsibility for their own career, and for those who wish to be a part of the solution to ensure the continued success and relevance of GLAM organisations in our society. You will walk away with clarity and knowledge of what the top skills required for 21st century GLAMs are, with ideas of how to increase your competence in these key areas (free where possible!). You will also have access to a Professional Development Plan you can download and utilise to organise your future Professional Development priorities. Slides will be provided.
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From chaos to calm through storytelling and community building in GLAM and beyond: A journey and conversation about Knowledge Management
Clare O’Hanlon & Eleanor Colla

Knowledge Management (KM) can help us learn to better understand and thrive in the face of the ever-changing, unknown and often chaotic digital environment by giving us strategies and tools to learn through collaboration, stories, playing and experimenting with ideas and technology, and reflection. KM has given us the tools to start thriving in this environment and we want to share and discuss them with you.   You will get a brief introduction to knowledge management and insight into our experiences with KM from small community and activist organisations to large universities. We will discuss communities of practice and storytelling experiences to help illustrate success and risk factors of these tools for managing tacit knowledge that often resonate with GLAM professionals. Through this, we will start a dialogue by encouraging you to reflect on and share your own experiences with KM, giving you strategies and tools to increase inclusivity and diversity and craft stories for advocacy, activism, and community building within the sector and with the communities you serve.
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Library Leadership: A DIY Career
Maeva Masterson

This session is aimed at demystifying the skills required to become a leader or manager. Covering practical suggestions and frameworks for growing and developing into the leader you want to be with a focus on innovation, flexibility and reflective practice. Join me to explore and be challenged to think about leadership and management in order to future-proof ourselves. Planning a career with purpose means you can have the skillset and practical strategies to DIY your library career.
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IT TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! What to expect in a modern Library Management System: A hands-on workshop using Koha
Bob and Irma Birchall

The workshop is targeted to librarians with little or no exposure to the workings of a Library Management System, more specifically, the open source system Koha. In this workshop, a range of library materials will be assembled with which participants will interact, both in the role of library patron and in the role of librarian. As patrons, participants will search the catalogue, borrow and return books and place reservations. As librarians, participants will process those transactions in Koha. They will also have the opportunity to catalogue new items and see these appear in the catalogue. The workshop facilitators will then invite reflection on experience, posing ‘what-if’ questions before an in-depth discussion on the advanced features of the product.
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TRAINING ROOM

WORKSHOP! Oral History Projects: making it simple
Sharee Cordes

Oral History projects hold a great deal of interest for communities, but the practicalities of undertaking one are often overwhelming. However, new technologies are making it easier and less intimidating to record archival quality interviews enabling us to open up these projects to more community involvement. In this workshop Sharee will share her experience of working with communities and discuss the pros and cons of this style of project. In this workshop we will explore the apps that can be used to record archival standard oral histories and also to make simple digital stories. Practical aspects such as what questions to ask and what to do with your interviews after they are recorded will also be discussed. This workshop is most suited to iPhones and iPads although Android alternatives will be offered. Participants should bring their own devices and be prepared to download two free apps.
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CONFERENCE ROOM

WORKSHOP! Librarians and Dragons
Madelin Meddlycott & Michael Hawks

This workshop will help LIS students and new graduates identify skills they already have and how they can transfer these skills to the library world – but in a fun way! Libraries and Dragons uses gamification to promote professional development for librarians, and to encourage a different way of thinking about the skills that we as new graduates can bring to the table. The workshop brings in ideas and concepts from role playing games, such as dungeons and dragons, to offer a different way of viewing our professional development. The workshop will take participants on a quest through a library experience, using predeveloped characters, before tasking everyone to develop their own character profiles, focusing on their abilities (transferable skills), legendary items (qualifications) and completed trials (experience), and to begin thinking about other ‘quests’ we, as new members of the LIS community, can go on to ‘level up’.
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FERGUSON ROOM

But I dont want to code: Three emerging IT Skills for Librarians (other than coding) and how to start developing them
Samantha Searle

There is a lot of interest in coding right now, but coding is just one of many IT skills that could be relevant in your future career. This session is aimed at tech-savvy new professionals who want to increase their employability by combining library and IT skills, but may not be aware of the variety of skillsets within the IT profession and how these can be applied. You will be introduced to the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA), an IT industry competency framework used in over 200 countries. The session will then look at three IT skills you could apply in libraries and other GLAM contexts: business process improvement, change management, and user experience analysis. Case studies of librarians practising these skills as part of their roles will be included, along with pointers to professional development pathways (with a focus on no- or low-cost options).
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Free software, open standards and you
Michael Harris

In this presentation I will talk about Free Software (aka open source software) (e.g. Koha, LibreOffice and Linux), open standards (e.g. Dublin Core and OpenDocument (ODF)), and related topics, and why libraries should be using and promoting these. Open standards and Free Software can save you money, make your systems more secure, let you work better with colleagues, and allows you to move vendors easily.
If you have ever had a colleague unable to open documents because they have different software to you, you may have encountered an issue with non-open standards. If you have ever had software become unsupported on a new operating system with a vendor disinterested in helping, then you have discovered something where Free Software might be able to help.
The session will finish with a directed discussion looking at some of the themes of the presentation.
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Increasing Digital Preservation Skills in Libraries
Kimberley Dye

Digital Preservation is a challenge which many GLAMR institutions are grappling with. To address this need for digital preservation awareness and skills development, the National and State Libraries of Australasia (NSLA) group coordinated the Digital Skills Program. This has led to the implementation of the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Outreach Education (DPOE) Program and Digital Forensics Workshops across (NSLA) institutions. The program creates a greater understanding of digital common knowledge, language and skills through shared training across the NSLA network. The session will provide practical information to help recently graduated GLAMR industry professionals in beginning to tackle the challenges of born digital material in their institutions and navigate the digital preservation landscape.
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